Impression № 048: Maravillas del Universo

Miguel Almagro brings us this fantastic drawing. Almagro draws inspiration from artists like Robert Crumb, Herge, Moebius, and Richard Corben and from literature by such authors as Borges and Bukowski. He is currently developing a series of drawings called “Lovecraft.”

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Miguel Almagro is an amateur artist living and working in Barcelona. He works in many media, but recently has begun focusing on using markers and digital drawing. He blogs here and his flickr is here. His posts at Dr. Hurley’s Snake-Oil Cure can be found here.

Impression № 004: Angelika Peißker

Angelika Peißker tells Dr. Hurley about her art: “I’m fascinated by simplicity and silence and the strength that comes from it. In my drawings I try to discover the beauty of silence and dreams that comes out of this state.

Since I was a child I have loved pencil drawing – it’s a passion that has never left me. My work is very personal, full of memories that I try to express.

In my work I try to remember the beauty of life and try to share something precious and magical with people out there to give them a smile.”

Dr. Hurley’s Digest: Week Three

In case you fell behind in your Dr. Hurley-prescribed, anti-tedium treatments, here’s a round-up:

Textual

Historical

Versical

Visual

Imbibable

 

ALSO: Don’t forget that Dr. Hurley is accepting your submissions of writing and art – look to our submission guidelines here and check out our Flickr group here.

 

Impression № 002: Tiny Things


Knox discusses her art with Dr. Hurley:

“I am attracted to the still-life subject not only because it presents an opportunity to intimately know an object through the drawing process, but also because the still-life represents a moment. A still-life is not only the object, but also the light, even the weather and the artist’s mood. The choice of objects and their placement conveys a certain feeling. In “Small Vials,” the feeling is of contrasts and sparkling light. The objects are similar in both being made of glass, but their form and the way the late-afternoon light passes through them differs. “Turkish Hazelnut” presented an exercise in texture. The shaggy husk enclosing its smooth edible nut has strange finger-like appendages, and those cast almost eerie shadows.”

“For as long as I’ve been putting pencil to paper, most of my subjects have been things small, ephemeral, and jewel-like. My dad says that when I was still toddler-age, a dragonfly alighted on my skirt, and I stared at it intently for as long as it rested there, then took up a stick and drew a dragonfly in the sand. This seems too poetic to be true, but I like the image and it does seem like me.”Graphite on paper, by E. Knox.

Impression № 001: Fault lines

Graphite on paper, by Michaela Irving.

Michaela Irving talks to Dr. Hurley’s Snake-Oil Cure about her art:

“I draw portraits using graphite pencil on paper as I find this gray scale effect highlights peoples expressions rather than distracting the viewer by using colour. It also shows the starkness of people’s lives.

“I try to make people think about who they are and who other people are by bringing out the models inner- or flip-side.

“With poster boys, I bring out their dark side; with homeless people I try to show their sensitivity or humanity. Homeless people are particularly interesting subjects as they are unseen, ignored or forgotten people, as their contrast with the “perfection” of other society is painful. It is easier to ignore these people than to see how easy it is to become like them, not necessarily financially but emotionally. People who look at my drawings are forced to see homeless people’s humanity, and so face their own pain through connecting with this darkness.”

Michaela Irving talks to Dr. Hurley’s Snake-Oil Cure about her art:

I draw portraits using graphite pencil on paper as I find this gray scale effect highlights peoples expressions rather than distracting the viewer by using colour. It also shows the starkness of people’s lives.