Exposure № 088: Larry

Photographer Nils Blondon: The medium used is digital. The photos are captured at a focal length of 35mm with a Sony Alpha 330 D-SLR. I never leave my house without my camera, and often spend hours trolling through vacant homes and storefronts looking for a good shot. I look for grit and character in my subjects, and it often works as a system of barter – they ask me for smokes, or money, and in return, I ask for a photo. I’m on a first name basis with nearly all of those I shoot. I take the time to sit with them and ask questions. I always shake my hands and introduce myself after I take their picture.

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Nils Blondon is a writer, photographer, student, and educator with a background in music, journalism, and social work.  His recent projects include the photo-documentation of Toronto’s disused buildings, along with its displaced, addicted, and homeless residents. He takes time to establish a rapport with those he shoots. All of his subjects participate willingly. His other contributions to Snake-Oil Cure can be found here.

Impression № 001: Fault lines

Graphite on paper, by Michaela Irving.

Michaela Irving talks to Dr. Hurley’s Snake-Oil Cure about her art:

“I draw portraits using graphite pencil on paper as I find this gray scale effect highlights peoples expressions rather than distracting the viewer by using colour. It also shows the starkness of people’s lives.

“I try to make people think about who they are and who other people are by bringing out the models inner- or flip-side.

“With poster boys, I bring out their dark side; with homeless people I try to show their sensitivity or humanity. Homeless people are particularly interesting subjects as they are unseen, ignored or forgotten people, as their contrast with the “perfection” of other society is painful. It is easier to ignore these people than to see how easy it is to become like them, not necessarily financially but emotionally. People who look at my drawings are forced to see homeless people’s humanity, and so face their own pain through connecting with this darkness.”

Michaela Irving talks to Dr. Hurley’s Snake-Oil Cure about her art:

I draw portraits using graphite pencil on paper as I find this gray scale effect highlights peoples expressions rather than distracting the viewer by using colour. It also shows the starkness of people’s lives.