Young Lovers

.

here is something about those
young lovers at the park, shameless
about their public displays.

I blush, old fashioned, conditioned by
my middle class sensibilities.

They ignore me, locked in
a space of privacy that
my conspicuous gaze
cannot penetrate.

I wonder whether
to tap into their reverie,
breaking their concentration
with a mad howl.

My illogical plans clash,
a warning, intimating me
to the possibilities that
my own life lacks.

* * * * *

Sanchari Sur is a Bengali Canadian who was born in Calcutta, India. Her photography, poetry and short fiction have been published or are forthcoming in Map Literary, Barely South Review,Red River Review, Black Fox Literary Review, Urban Shots – Crossroads (India: Grey Oak/Westland, 2012) and elsewhere. Her short story, “Those Sri Lankan Boys,” was selected to be a part of Diaspora Dialogues Youth Mentoring Program in Toronto this year. You can find her at http://sursanchari.wordpress.com.

Ghazal of Desire

.

esire is a basic human need, so said Rumi, forgetting
that most hold their desire in, veiled in silence.

Dogs piss, crows crow, and the world seems seminal,
yet our desire throbs, alive, ardent, existing in silence.

The man waiting for his death sentence to commence,
counts the sins he has committed, repenting in silence.

A woman screams, trying to piece together the memory
of her stillborn son she held for moments in silence.

The man across the street watering his garden, thinks
of fucking his neighbour’s wife, daydreaming in silence.

The woman cheating on her husband, begs her lover
for yet another visit, justifying the breach of trust in silence.

Sometimes, there is a face from the past, a halo
of panic, surviving as shards of longing in silence.

‘And you, Sanchari?’ ‘I? I watch these dramas unfold around me,
thankful that all I have to mourn is a broken heart, in silence’.

* * * * *

Sanchari Sur is a Bengali Canadian who was born in Calcutta, India. Her photography, poetry and short fiction have been published or are forthcoming in Map Literary, Barely South Review,Red River Review, Black Fox Literary Review, Urban Shots – Crossroads (India: Grey Oak/Westland, 2012) and elsewhere. Her short story, “Those Sri Lankan Boys,” was selected to be a part of Diaspora Dialogues Youth Mentoring Program in Toronto this year. You can find her at http://sursanchari.wordpress.com.

Hurley Pulp: Emerald Eyes

.

e reminded me of Freud, with his beard and glasses. I had never seen eyes like his.

Nobody in the city had emerald eyes.

He had come to Calcutta to consult with my husband, Dr. Dibyendu Sur, about the
medicinal properties of neem.

I didn’t see much of Dr. Hurley. Often, he would work late into the night at the temporary
lab he had set up.

I became pregnant shortly after he left India. My husband was overjoyed and bought me
an expensive Benarasi silk sari.

It was a boy. He had his father’s looks. Dark hair. And, emerald eyes.

Sanchari Sur

Fasting and Feasting

The torso lay
severed, disconnected, discarded;
an umbilical cord
after the act of birthing.

Vacant eyes, mirroring
suspended terror, a hagiography
commemorating the feast
of flies.

* * * * *

Sanchari Sur is a Bengali Canadian who was born in Calcutta, India. Her photography, poetry and short fiction have been published or are forthcoming in Map Literary, Barely South Review,Red River Review, Black Fox Literary Review, Urban Shots – Crossroads (India: Grey Oak/Westland, 2012) and elsewhere. Her short story, “Those Sri Lankan Boys,” was selected to be a part of Diaspora Dialogues Youth Mentoring Program in Toronto this year. You can find her at http://sursanchari.wordpress.com. Her contributions to Dr. Hurley’s Snake-Oil Cure can be seen here.